I recall with great fondness show-and-tell Fridays in kindergarten and grade 1.   Fuzzy new slippers, a bunny, a kid sister and a bag of coconut are among those that stand out in my memory.  Listening to my classmates only talk about their precious treasures would surely have instilled in me an early disdain for lectures or monologues.

In recent months, I’ve been called upon on numerous occasions to sell, show, define and defend social media, its worth and usage within and for our department.  In doing so, I’m no longer armed with paper or a USB stick loaded with various powerpoint presentations or paper copies people can bury their noses in while I try to point out new and exciting ideas.

Presentations have moved away from the bullet lists and ‘catch alls’ for messaging to more succinct, albeit longer, visually appealing models.   Any of you attending any 2.0 conferences, reading this or any other blog know the ones.  What remains missing from these, however, is the excitement that generates from the good ‘ole show-and-tell.

The web is dynamic.  Twitter streams are active.  Video needs to be seen, not screen captured.  Flash shouldn’t be seen in static form.  The work I manage is online.  Those features and new approaches we’re exploring are best showcased, not defined.  Sadly, I can’t count on only one hand the number of  “web” meetings I’ve participated in where the computer hasn’t been turned on.

The Web is dynamic and engaging – those of us charged with its development, management and evolution are  enthusiastic and informed people.

Show it, talk about it and sell it.

Onward.

M.